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The House of Chief Constable Aschan

The house of Chief Constable Aschan is a unique urban residence of the inland regions of Finland. Stepping though the gate, visitors are transported two centuries back in time in the courtyard and garden. Inside the house the special atmosphere of Heinola as the seat of the provincial government is recreated with furniture, wall coverings and artefacts of the Gustavian period of the late 18th century, named after King Gustav III of Sweden. The garden is laid out in the late 18th-century style and each summer household and ornamental plants of the period are grown there. During weeks 50 and 51, a late 1700s Christmas is celebrated in the house with candlelight and the scent of spices.

The house was built in the early 1780s as the home of the chief constable of the Province of Kymenkartano. The mansard-roofed building has cladding of upright boards originally painted with reddle and windows of 4 or 16 panes with shutters. The present horizontal boarding painted with yellow ochre dates from repairs carried out in the 1840s, the last major renovation of the building. This house is in many ways typical of Heinola in the 18th century. It has a so-called Carolingian floor plan with a drawing room in the middle, flanked by two rooms and with an entrance hall in front of it. There are bedrooms at both ends of the mansard storey. Except for the kitchen and entrance hall, the interior has remained almost completely in its 18th-century appearance. The rooms have Gustavian-period wallpaper and marbled wainscoting. The doors are of the three-panel Rococo type, and the ceilings and floors are original features.

Address: Kauppakatu 3, 18100 Heinola
Open: 15.5.-12.9.2010 and weeks 50-51 Tue., Thu.-Sun. Noon - 4 p.m., Wed. Noon- 8 p.m., Mon. closed
Entrance: Adults € 3, students € 2
Enquiries: Tel. (03) 849 3655, fax (03) 715 2137, museo(at)heinola.fi
Further information: The 18th-century custom of celebrating Christmas is displayed during weeks 50 and 51.